February and March: Looking back, looking ahead

One year ago, I wrote a “looking back, looking ahead” post for all of spring, comprising the months of March, April, and May. I’d like to avoid such a backlog this time around, but here I am, reflecting on February and March, smack dab in the middle of April. The funny/annoying thing is, while February and March were certainly not a snooze fest, they were fairly relaxed (March, in particular), so I don’t really even have a good excuse for my radio silence here.

Duchess has had a lot going on in the past couple of months: our new album, Laughing at Life, was released to critical acclaim in February, and we rode the momentum with the launch of our podcast, Harmony & Hijinks, as well as tours to the midwest and Canada and a standing-room-only four-night run at Greenwich Village’s 55 bar.

In my solo singing life, we continued post-production on The Late Set, my upcoming CD with pianist Ehud Asherie. In the last days of March, I spent a couple of days in Hilton Head, South Carolina singing at the Jazz Corner with Ehud, joined by New Orleans clarinetist Evan Christopher.

A few of the home-cooked meals that brightened February and March: butternut squash and pork sausage done cacio e pepe style; beef stew with anchovies and olives; kielbasa on split pea puree with caraway butter.

February and March were also filled with some lovely meals—both at home and in restaurants—and (probably too much) time binge-watching some fantastic new and new-to-me TV shows on Amazon Prime.

A few meals eaten out and about: savory ramen in Toronto; a pre-Valentine’s Day Spanish-style feast at Brooklyn’s La Vara; a rainy-day visit to Peking Duck House in Chinatown, following a screening of Woody Allen’s “Manhattan” at Film Forum.

Looking ahead, there’s much to tell about April, including recent travels to Mexico and an upcoming Pacific Northwest tour with Duchess, but I’ll save all that for a couple of weeks, when I’ll be writing my end-of-month musings at the appropriate time (!).

In February and March, I…
Blogged about: January. Getting back on my (culinary) feet.

Read: La Venessiana, a Venice-centric blog that, however briefly, transports me to La Serenissima. This article by Tamar Adler about having a “house meal.” I wouldn’t say we have a “house meal,” per se—that is, we don’t do a lot of template cooking—but I find great comfort in the handful of stalwart recipes that we make again and again.

Watched: A whole lot of great shows on Amazon Prime. The Man in the High Castle, which asks the question, “What if the other side had won WWII?” Completely engrossing. Mozart in the Jungle, which boasts a fantastic cast (Gael Garcia Bernal, Bernadette Peters) and puts classical music in the spotlight. Goliath, starring the always-excellent Billy Bob Thornton as a brilliant but troubled lawyer who takes on a wrongful death case against a huge corporation and his old law firm. The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, set in 1958 New York City and centering on a young Jewish housewife’s foray into the world of stand-up comedy. The soundtrack for the pilot was filled with Blossom Dearie, Peggy Lee, and super-young Barbra Streisand. I am delighted—delighted!—that this show was greenlit for two seasons.

Listened to: Luiz Bonfa, Solo in Rio, 1959, damn near every morning. A lovely way to start the day. At the Supper Club, with Peggy Lee subbing for Jo Stafford. A friend gave me a CD of some rare live radio broadcasts from 1946 and 1949, recorded for the Armed Forces Radio Service, and they are a delight from start to finish (thank you, Stan!). Here’s the Thing, with Alec Baldwin. His interviews with Elaine Stritch and John Turturro had me howling with laughter.

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Spring: Looking back, looking ahead

All too quickly, spring has come and gone and we are careening full tilt toward summer. What can I say about the past few months? March took me to Mexico, where I spent a lovely week with my parents, who live on the Baja.

We sipped mango smoothies in the mornings and strolled long stretches of the all-but-deserted beach in the afternoon. We cooked lots of delicious food and drank lots of ice-cold Mexican beer. We road-tripped to El Triunfo, Todos Santos (my favorite) and La Paz. I delighted in painterly Baja sunsets and the velvety-dark night sky, perfect for stargazing. I can’t wait to go back.

Mexico1

April’s highlight was a quick tour to Montana with Duchess. That same month, I joined millions of fans in mourning Prince’s untimely death. Then, May ushered in a stubborn summer cold (yuck) and the recording of Duchess’ second CD (yay!).

Looking ahead, I am eagerly anticipating a return to Northern California for a tour with Duchess next week. June has been fast-paced and full of activity, but the rest of the summer looks quite relaxed, with time for afternoons spent reading in the park, weekend getaways, and (I hope!) spontaneous beach days.

Also on my summer agenda? Digging deep into this book and honing my sight-reading skills. Summer school, if you will.

This spring, I…
Blogged about: Singer-friend Thana Alexa. Duchess’ upcoming new CD & recent Montana tour. The Everlasting Now.

Read: I did a lot of reading the past few months. I’ll spare you the complete list, but here are some of the books that stand out. And Again, by Jessica Chiarella. A vaguely dystopian novel whose premise centers on the complex ethical issues surrounding human cloning. At its core, though, this is really a novel about identity; what actually is the “self” when a person’s body (and a lifetime of scars, piercings, tattoos, and illnesses) can be erased and recreated as new? Better than Before: Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday Lives, by Gretchen Rubin. In all honesty, Rubin’s approach to life often comes across as austere, or even joyless, but her research on how and why we form (and keep!) habits was interesting and useful. A House in the Heights, by Truman Capote. Some of the loveliest prose I have ever read, with the added delight of being set in my neighborhood, Brooklyn Heights. I wanted to memorize each sentence. Fates and Furies, by Lauren Groff. A challenging and extremely well-written portrait of a marriage. The Swans of Fifth Avenue, by Melanie Benjamin. A feather-light but enjoyable imagining of the real-life friendship between Truman Capote and New York socialites in the 1950s. The Voiceover Artist, by Dave Reidy. Wry and sweet, and imbued throughout with a sense of place (the novel is set in Chicago), I enjoyed this debut novel. In Some Other World, Maybe, by Shari Goldhagen. I expected this novel to be a fluffy read, but it was poignant and smart and human. I really liked it.

Watched: Birdman (on the plane from Montana). Sophie’s Choice. I’d read William Styron’s novel and seen the film adaptation years ago, but was blown away all over again by the actors’ nuanced, earnest performances. Silicon Valley and Veep, both of which make me cackle.

Listened to: Chris Isaak, The Baja Sessions. I’ve loved this record for years, but after my idyllic week on the Baja in March, I’ll forever associate it with long drives through Mexico. Prince. Lots and lots of Prince. Peggy Lee.

 

March: Looking back, looking ahead

Yesterday marked my twelve-year anniversary as a New Yorker.  Twelve years!  That’s longer than I’ve ever lived anywhere.  New York affords its denizens many things: museums, music, theatre, late-night food delivery, (increasingly expensive) public transportation, and endless diversity, to name but a few.  But I think that the greatest gift that this city bestows on its citizenry, though, is the potential and permission for reinvention.  By chance or by design, a person can live many different lifetimes here.  My own tenure in NYC has encompassed half a dozen apartments, five waitressing jobs, a college degree, a Broadway show, and countless gigs spanning multiple musical genres.  It’s been a wild and wonderful ride so far, and I am so grateful for the chance to live and make music in this most wonderful of cities.

DUCHESS backstage at the Jazz Standard, March 3, 2015.

DUCHESS backstage at the Jazz Standard, March 3, 2015.

March was filled with joy-inducing musical experiences. The month kicked off with DUCHESS‘ CD release show at the Jazz Standard.  Despite wintry weather (read: yet another blizzard), we had a packed house and a good time was had by all.  Then, a couple of weeks later, I returned to Mezzrow to perform with my old pal Ehud Asherie, a brilliant pianist with whom I’ve been exploring the music of Rodgers & Hart.  Our dear friend Michael Steinman, of JAZZ LIVES, wrote a couple of lovely posts about the evening, which you can read here and here.  And, if you’re so inclined, you can check out a video of our version of “Ten Cents a Dance” below.

Looking ahead, I’ll be doing some choral singing at Maundy Thursday and Good Friday services this week (what does “Maundy” mean, anyway?), and it’s always a treat to celebrate Passover with my husband and his family.  I’m also looking forward to being part of this show, helmed by the aforementioned Ehud Asherie and featuring the brilliant vocalists Brianna Thomas and Lezlie Harrison.  And a big highlight in April will be mid-month, when Stevie Wonder brings his “Songs In The Key Of Life” tour to town.  That album is one of the most important musical touchstones in my life, and I still can’t believe I’ll get to experience hearing it live!

In March, I…
Blogged about: Singer-friend Nancy Harms.  February.

Watched: The Breakfast Club.  In a movie theatre.  I was too young to see it on the big screen when this iconic John Hughes film was released 30 years ago (!!!), so I couldn’t miss the chance to catch the revival.  After all these years, the film’s poignancy and humor still feel relevant.

Read: JAZZ LIVES.  How lucky we musicians are to have Michael Steinman in our midst!  His ears and heart are wide open, as revealed in his beautiful post about Louis Armstrong.  Michael’s eloquence and kindness extends to present-day players, too, as evidenced in this gem about a recent performance by Michael Kanan and friends.

Listened to: Mary Foster Conklin‘s WBAI radio broadcast in honor of International Women’s Day.  She curated a wonderful two-hour set of female vocalists, performing (almost) exclusively songs written by women.